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dc.contributor.authorBernatíková, Šárka
dc.contributor.authorDudáček, Aleš
dc.contributor.authorPřichystalová, Radka
dc.contributor.authorKlečka, Vít
dc.contributor.authorKocůrková, Lucie
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-19T08:33:36Z
dc.date.available2021-03-19T08:33:36Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021, vol. 18, issue 3, art. no. 929.cs
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10084/142972
dc.description.abstractCurrently, widely available three-dimensional (3D) printers are very popular with the public. Previous research has shown that these printers can emit ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Several studies have examined the emissivity of filaments from 3D printing, except glycol modified polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) and styrene free co-polyester (NGEN) filaments. The aim of this study was to evaluate UFP and VOC emissions when printing using a commonly available 3D printer (ORIGINAL PRUSA i3 MK2 printer) using PETG and NGEN. The concentrations of UFPs were determined via measurements of particle number concentration and size distribution. A thermal analysis was carried out to ascertain whether signs of fiber decomposition would occur at printing temperatures. The total amount of VOCs was determined using a photoionization detector, and qualitatively analyzed via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total particle concentrations were 3.88 x 10(10) particles for PETG and 6.01 x 10(9) particles for NGEN. VOCs at very low concentrations were detected in both filaments, namely ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylene. In addition, styrene was identified in PETG. On the basis of our results, we recommend conducting additional measurements, to more accurately quantify personal exposure to both UFPs and VOCs, focusing on longer exposure as it can be a source of potential cancer risk.cs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherMDPIcs
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthcs
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030929cs
dc.rights© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.cs
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/cs
dc.subjectultrafine particlescs
dc.subject3D printingcs
dc.subjectVOCscs
dc.subjectexposurecs
dc.titleCharacterization of ultrafine particles and VOCs emitted from a 3D printercs
dc.typearticlecs
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18030929
dc.rights.accessopenAccesscs
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioncs
dc.type.statusPeer-reviewedcs
dc.description.sourceWeb of Sciencecs
dc.description.volume18cs
dc.description.issue3cs
dc.description.firstpageart. no. 929cs
dc.identifier.wos000615154900001


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© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.