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dc.contributor.authorLaciok, Vendula
dc.contributor.authorSikorová, Kateřina
dc.contributor.authorFabiano, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorBernatík, Aleš
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-12T10:08:32Z
dc.date.available2021-03-12T10:08:32Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationSustainability. 2021, vol. 13, issue 2, art. no. 524.cs
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10084/142953
dc.description.abstractIndustry and related work and workplaces are constantly changing as a result of the implementation of new technologies, substances and work processes, changes in the composition of the workforce and the labor market, and new forms of employment and work organization. The implementation of new technologies represents certain ambivalence. Next to the positive impact on workers' health, new risks and challenges can arise in the area of process and occupational safety and health of people at work. On these bases, it follows the need for predicting and handling the new risks, in order to ensure safe and healthy workplaces in the future. The aim of most forecasting studies is not only to identify new emerging risks, but also to foresee changes that could affect occupational safety and health. However, a number of questions still require proper investigation, i.e., "What impact do new emerging risks have on tertiary education in the area of Safety engineering? Has tertiary education already reacted to progress in science and research and does it have these innovations in its syllabus? How are tertiary graduates prepared for the real world of new technologies?" This paper represents a first attempt in the literature to provide answers to the raised questions, by a survey approach involving academics, Health Safety and Environment (HSE) industrial experts and university students in the Czech Republic. Even if statistical evaluation is limited to a single Country and to a small sample size, the obtained results allow suggesting practical recommendations that can contribute to ensuring new challenges in the area of education by addressing relevant culture issues needed to support new workplace realities according to the newly defined Safety 4.0.cs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherMDPIcs
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSustainabilitycs
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.3390/su13020524cs
dc.rights© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.cs
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/cs
dc.subjectdigital technologies and riskcs
dc.subjectoccupational safety and healthcs
dc.subjectprocess safety engineeringcs
dc.subjectSafety 4.0cs
dc.subjectsustainable educationcs
dc.titleTrends and opportunities of tertiary education in safety engineering moving towards Safety 4.0cs
dc.typearticlecs
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su13020524
dc.rights.accessopenAccesscs
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioncs
dc.type.statusPeer-reviewedcs
dc.description.sourceWeb of Sciencecs
dc.description.volume13cs
dc.description.issue2cs
dc.description.firstpageart. no. 524cs
dc.identifier.wos000611761200001


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© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.