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dc.contributor.authorPeter, Lukáš
dc.contributor.authorKracík, Jan
dc.contributor.authorČerný, Martin
dc.contributor.authorNoury, Norbert
dc.contributor.authorPolzer, Stanislav
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T09:50:14Z
dc.date.available2020-06-26T09:50:14Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationProcesses. 2020, vol. 8, issue 4, art. no. 442.cs
dc.identifier.issn2227-9717
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10084/139598
dc.description.abstractBackground: Continuous non-invasive blood pressure (BP) measurement is a desired virtue in clinical practice. Unfortunately, current systems do not allow one for continuous, reliable BP measurement for more than a few hours per day, and they often require a complicated set of sensors to provide the necessary biosignals. Therefore we investigated the possibility of proposing a computational model that would predict the BP from pulse waves recorded in a single spot. Methods: Two experimental circuits were created. One containing a simple plastic tube for model development and a second with a silicone molded patient-specific arterial tree model. The first model served for the measuring of pulse waves under various BP (70-270 mmHg) and heart rate (60-190 beats per minute) values. Four different computational models were used to estimate the BP values from the diastolic time. The most accurate model was further validated using data from the latter experimental circuit containing a molded patient-specific silicone arterial tree. The measured data were averaged over a window of one, three, and five cycles. Two models based on pulse arrival time (PAT) were also analyzed for comparison. Results: The most accurate model exhibits a correlation coefficient of r = 0.967. The Bland-Altman plot revealed standard deviations (SD) between the model predictions and measurement of 10, 8.3, and 7.5 mmHg for the systolic BP and 8.7, 7 and 6.3 mmHg for the diastolic BP (both pressures calculated for the averaging windows of one, three, and five cycles, respectively). The best of the used PAT based model exhibited a SD of 17, 16, and 15 mmHg for the systolic BP and 14, 13, and 12 mmHg for the diastolic BP for the same averaging windows. Discussion: The proposed model showed its capability to predict BP accurately from the shape of the pulse wave measured at a single spot. Its SD was about 50% lower compared to the PAT based models which met the requirements of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation.cs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherMDPIcs
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProcessescs
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.3390/pr8040442cs
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.cs
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/cs
dc.subjectcontinuous non-invasive blood pressurecs
dc.subjectexperimental modelcs
dc.subjectpulse wave analysiscs
dc.subjectblood pressure predictioncs
dc.titleMathematical model based on the shape of pulse waves measured at a single spot for the non-invasive prediction of blood pressurecs
dc.typearticlecs
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/pr8040442
dc.rights.accessopenAccesscs
dc.type.versionpublishedVersioncs
dc.type.statusPeer-reviewedcs
dc.description.sourceWeb of Sciencecs
dc.description.volume8cs
dc.description.issue4cs
dc.description.firstpageart. no. 442cs
dc.identifier.wos000536891900103


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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.